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2011 Scott Amundsen Centenary Race to the Pole

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The dream

About 8 months ago Braam Malherbe contacted me to ask if I would be keen to take part in a race to the South Pole. Is the Pope catholic??? At that stage I was busy planning my Capri-X Expedition and about to set off with my wife Kim on her Tri the Beloved Country Expedition. After months of uncertainty around sponsorship, it is finally a certainty. Braam and I will be the two man South African team taking part in the Scott – Amundsen Centenary Race to the Pole. I am very excited about racing with Braam who I am sure I will be able to learn lots from. You can watch this race unfold right here on this website or on faceBook – http://www.facebook.com/groups/87253326710/ or check out Braams website www.braammalherbe.com

Teaming up

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Resources

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Goals

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Preparation

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Detail

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Fear

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Strategy

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Setbacks

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Decisions

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Discipline

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Perseverance

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Focus

To high light the issues around climate-change, but in particular, how it will (and is) effecting all South Africans. Antarctica holds approximately 60% of ALL FRESH WATER ON EARTH in its summer months and 80% in its winter months…and it is melting. So how does that effect me in my micro world in South Africa and why is the Antarctic region so important.

The Antarctic region is an important regulator of global climate. The Southern Ocean is a significant sink for both heat and carbon dioxide, acting as a buffer against human-induced climate change. The sea ice that forms around the continent each winter controls the exchange of energy between the Sun and the Earth, and its partition between atmosphere and ocean. As sea ice forms, brine rejected from the ice increases the density of the upper ocean. These waters then sink and form the deep ocean currents that carry heat around the globe.
Changes in global climate can have impacts on the Antarctic environment. The Southern Ocean supports a unique ecosystem that is well adapted to present climate conditions. Changes in ocean temperatures, currents and sea ice will impact on this ecosystem, possibly changing the ocean’s capacity to absorb carbon dioxide. Warming of the atmosphere and ocean around Antarctica may lead to increased loss of mass from the Antarctic ice sheets and hence a rise in global sea level. In order to make soundly-based predictions of how the global environment may change over the coming decades and centuries, we need to understand the role played by the Antarctic in the Earth system.

Whilst we journey to the South pole, Braam and I want to show the reality of what is happening but, importantly, show all South Africans what they can do to ‘lead the world by example’ and how by “doing just one thing” they play a profound role in curbing this already catastrophic crisis.

The storm

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Remember

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The end

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